Corporation Nation-States [3]: Competition is King

competition is king

We’ve seen that corporations and their CEO’s are increasingly implementing socio-economic policies deemed to be “good” for their constituents and for the world at large — combining the conventional roles of philanthropy and government. That sounds altruistic, but it’s entirely in line with conventional capitalist theory, which relies on competition to achieve both outcomes, and in return asks government to keep the marketplace free of anti-competitive barriers.

This theory was evident in an article that came out as I was writing this mini-series .  What Companies Are For:  Competition, Not Corporatism, Is The Answer To Capitalism’s Problems, The Economist (Aug 22, 2019). These excerpts speak for themselves:

“Across the West, capitalism is not working as well as it should. Jobs are plentiful, but growth is sluggish, inequality is too high and the environment is suffering. You might hope that governments would enact reforms to deal with this, but politics in many places is gridlocked or unstable.

“Who, then, is going to ride to the rescue? A growing number of people think the answer is to call on big business to help fix economic and social problems. Even America’s famously ruthless bosses agree. This week more than 180 of them, including the chiefs of Walmart and JPMorgan Chase, overturned three decades of orthodoxy to pledge that their firms’ purpose was no longer to serve their owners alone, but customers, staff, suppliers and communities, too.

“The CEOs’ motives are partly tactical. They hope to pre-empt attacks on big business from the left of the Democratic Party. But the shift is also part of an upheaval in attitudes towards business happening on both sides of the Atlantic. Younger staff want to work for firms that take a stand on the moral and political questions of the day.

“However well-meaning, this new form of collective capitalism will end up doing more harm than good. It risks entrenching a class of unaccountable CEOs who lack legitimacy. And it is a threat to long-term prosperity, which is the basic condition for capitalism to succeed.

“Ever since businesses were granted limited liability in Britain and France in the 19th century, there have been arguments about what society can expect in return. In the 1950s and 1960s America and Europe experimented with managerial capitalism, in which giant firms worked with the government and unions and offered workers job security and perks.

“It is this framework that is under assault. Part of the attack is about a perceived decline in business ethics, from bankers demanding bonuses and bail-outs both at the same time, to the sale of billions of opioid pills to addicts. But the main complaint is that shareholder value produces bad economic outcomes. Publicly listed firms are accused of a list of sins, from obsessing about short-term earnings to neglecting investment, exploiting staff, depressing wages and failing to pay for the catastrophic externalities they create, in particular pollution.

“The popular and intellectual backlash against shareholder value is already altering corporate decision-making. Bosses are endorsing social causes that are popular with customers and staff. Firms are deploying capital for reasons other than efficiency… this portends a system in which big business sets and pursues broad social goals, not its narrow self-interest.

“That sounds nice, but collective capitalism suffers from two pitfalls: a lack of accountability and a lack of dynamism. Consider accountability first. It is not clear how CEOs should know what “society” wants from their companies. The chances are that politicians, campaigning groups and the CEOs themselves will decide—and that ordinary people will not have a voice.

“The second problem is dynamism. Collective capitalism leans away from change. In a dynamic system firms have to forsake at least some stakeholders: a number need to shrink in order to reallocate capital and workers from obsolete industries to new ones.

“The way to make capitalism work better for all is not to limit accountability and dynamism, but to enhance them both. This requires that the purpose of companies should be set by their owners, not executives or campaigners.

“It also requires firms to adapt to society’s changing preferences. If consumers want fair-trade coffee, they should get it. If university graduates shun unethical companies, employers will have to shape up.

“Accountability works only if there is competition. This lowers prices, boosts productivity and ensures that firms cannot long sustain abnormally high profits. Moreover it encourages companies to anticipate the changing preferences of customers, workers and regulators—for fear that a rival will get there first.

“Unfortunately, since the 1990s, consolidation has left two-thirds of industries in America more concentrated. If you cast your eye down the list of the 180 American signatories this week, many are in industries that are oligopolies, including credit cards, cable tv, drug retailing and airlines, which overcharge consumers and have abysmal reputations for customer service. Unsurprisingly, none is keen on lowering barriers to entry.

“Of course a healthy, competitive economy requires an effective government—to enforce antitrust rules, to stamp out today’s excessive lobbying and cronyism, to tackle climate change. That well-functioning polity does not exist today, but empowering the bosses of big businesses to act as an expedient substitute is not the answer. The Western world needs innovation, widely spread ownership and diverse firms that adapt fast to society’s needs. That is the really enlightened kind of capitalism.”

Culturally sensitive or not, competition is “zero sum,” which means it’s a game with winners and losers. And anyone who wants to play should remember that the house always wins. More next time.

Corporation Nation-States [2]

Writing for Forbes earlier this year, a former British ambassador to the U.N. listed the rise of the corporate nation state as one of the reasons for the nation state’s eventual demise.

“Multinational corporations… operate globally, unrestricted by borders.  The biggest tech companies are now richer than most countries, and foreign Governments find it very difficult to tax them properly on the profits they make.

“If the Nation State system of governance were to come to an end, what would take its place? That takes us into the realm of even greater speculation.  Fiction offers some ideas – a World Government depicted in much science fiction; huge competing blocs, as in George Orwell’s 1984; the return of empires or the city state system of medieval Europe; or post- apocalyptic tribal units beloved of film writers.  None of these alternatives currently looks at all likely, but I think it unwise to assume that the current Nation State system will inevitably exist in 100 years time. “

The Beginning of the End of the Nation State? Forbes (Jan. 3, 2019)

Ever heard of an “anarcho-capitalist”? Me neither. But Doug Casey is one, and in his Mises Institute article The End of the Nation State he said this:[1]

“Even though things are starting to look truly grim for the individual, with collapsing economic structures and increasingly virulent governments, I suspect help is on the way from historical evolution. Just as the agricultural revolution put an end to tribalism and the industrial revolution killed the kingdom, I think we’re heading for another multipronged revolution that’s going to make the nation-state an anachronism.

“Why would that happen? Because of what ‘the evil genius Karl Marx’ called the ‘withering away of the State.’ By the end of this century, I suspect the US and most other nation-states will have, for all practical purposes, ceased to exist.”

If the nation state ends, what will replace it? And particularly, how will the replacement shape economic policy? Anarchist Casey welcomes the end of the state’s role in determining economic policy — which he thinks is fouling it up anyway:

“The way I see it, Thomas Paine had it right when he said: ‘My country is wherever liberty lives.’ But where does liberty live today? Actually, it no longer has a home. It’s become a true refugee since America, which was an excellent idea that grew roots in a country of that name, degenerated into the United States. Which is just another unfortunate nation-state. And it’s on the slippery slope.”

Free market purists trust multi-national corporations to do a better job than national governments, but one issue neither can escape is rising economic inequality, which has recently been given a new twist. This is from a Harvard Business Review IdeaCast:

“Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom discusses the research he’s conducted showing what’s really driving the growth of income inequality:  a widening gap between the most successful companies and the rest, across industries. In other words, inequality has less to do with what you do for work, and more to do with which specific company you work for. The rising gap in pay between firms accounts for a large majority of the rise in income inequality overall.

“BLOOM:  “We’ve looked in the US over the last 35 years, so going back to 1978. And what you see is firstly, there’s a huge increase in inequalities. That probably comes as no surprise to anyone.

The rich have got richer, the middle has kind of tapered along, and the poor have actually done worse over time. But what was amazing in our data is the vast majority there, so something like 70% or 80% of this increase in inequality can be explained by the firm you work in.

So inequality has gone up dramatically. But actually for most people, what’s happened is their colleagues have got richer or poorer with them. So inequality is mainly across firms. And actually, inequality within firms has really not increased that much.”

A widely-cited Deloitte article issued after the 2007-2008 recession reviewed the growth of income inequality and offered corporations some marketing advice:

 “Given the expectation of essentially two different types of consumers (affluent consumers with rising income versus low- and middle-income consumers with stagnant incomes), companies can either choose to target only one consumer group or undertake to segment the market and target each group separately. Targeting all consumers uniformly—that is, selling all things to all people—will likely be less effective.”

Mind The Gap:  What Business Needs To Know About Income Inequality, Deloitte (Jan. 1, 2011)

Attending to your marketing strategy addresses an issue faced by governments and corporations alike:  the need to generate revenue. Both also need to distribute that what’s left of that income after expenses, and according to commentators like Casey and Bloom, they both have some work to do on that topic.

More on corporate nation-states next time.

[1] The image above is from the article.

Corporation Nation-States

british east india company

dutch east india company

The first thing you learn about corporations in law school is the principle of limited liability:  the state trades the benefits of corporate business activities for letting investors off the hook if things run off the rails. The British and Dutch used this concept to colonize the world.

“Back in the seventeenth century, when the British and Dutch were first learning to exploit their overseas colonies, a problem emerged:  people were afraid to finance expeditions because they face jail if something went wrong and they couldn’t repay their loans. The solution these governments came up with was a corporate charter, which limited investors’ liability to the amount of their investment and nothing more.”

The Patterning Instinct:  A Cultural History of Humanity’s Search for Meaning, by  Jeremy Lent (2017). (Except where indicated otherwise, the quotes in this article are from this book.)

Technology hadn’t shrunk  the world yet, so the British and Dutch East India Companies (their flags are above) were granted autonomy to exercise state-like powers, such as the right to impose and collect tax, make treaties, wage war, take prisoners, and carry out the death penalty.

“Before long, though, it became clear that these legal charters created incentive to take inappropriate risks because the potential growth was greater than the downside. In England, after a series of spectacular frauds and a market crash, corporations were banned in 1720. The ban was eventually lifted when the Industrial Revolution generated demand for new investments in railways and other infrastructure.”

Corporate Republic, Wikipedia

Meanwhile, across the Atlantic,

“The political leaders of the United States, aware of the English experience, were suspicious of corporations. Thomas Jefferson wrote in 1815, ‘I hope we shall take warning from the [English] example and crush in its birth the aristocracy of our monied corporations which dare already to challenge our government to a trail of strength and bid defiance to the laws of our country.’ Accordingly, corporations in America were given limited charters with tightly constrained powers.”

In time, though, American skepticism gave way to the need to finance war and reconstruction, and to carry out the USA’s own industrial expansion. Opportunists again turned to the corporation — much to Abraham Lincoln’s chagrin:

“During the turmoil of the Civil War, industrialists took advantage of the disarray, leveraging widespread political corruption to expand their influence.

“Shortly before his death, Abraham Lincoln lamented what he saw happening with a resounding prophecy: ‘Corporations have been enthroned…. An era of corruption in high places will follow and the money power will endeavor to prolong its reign by working on the prejudices of the people… until wealth is aggregated in a few hands…. and the Republic is destroyed.’”

President Hayes later joined Lincoln in this lament:

“As the nation reconstructed itself, it increasingly fell under the sway of corporate power. ‘This is a government of the people, by the people, and for the people no longer. It is a government of corporations, by corporations, and for corporations,’ lamented Rutherford B. Hayes, who became president in 1877.

“Corporations took full advantage of their newfound dominance, influencing state legislatures to permit charters to be issued in perpetuity that gave them the right to do anything not explicitly prohibited by law. A crucial moment occurred in 1886, when the Supreme Court designated corporations as ‘persons’ entitled to the protection of the Fourteenth Amendment.”

From these contested beginnings came the corporation-nation states which — just as Jefferson predicted — have since gained enough political and economic power to challenge national governments “to a trial of strength” and “bid defiance to the laws” of their countries of origin.

“Around the globe, more and more corporations are beginning to act like governments.

“They negotiate with guerrilla leaders, build roads, and set up schools. Increasingly, they’re setting labor standards in places where nations can’t or won’t.

“There’s only one problem.

“By accepting more social responsibility, they’re taking on more power just as a small but growing backlash against rising corporate power is taking hold in the United States.

“At the heart of this debate lies a simple question: Who should set society’s agenda – big business or big government? How Americans answer that could well determine the future of issues as diverse as campaign-finance reform and antitrust action.”

Rise Of The Corporate Nation-State, (Apr. 10, 2000).

The sheer size of today’s corporation nation states would have been incomprehensible to Jefferson, Lincoln, and Hayes. Consider, for example, this Business Insider article that compares the revenues of “25 giant companies” to the GDP of nations. It found that, in 2017,

  • Walmart’s revenues exceed Belgium’s GDP
  • Volkswagen’s revenues are greater than the GDP of Chile
  • Apple’s revenues in were higher than Portugal’s GDP
  • Amazon’s revenue exceeded Kuwait’s GDP
  • Facebook’s income was greater than Serbia’s GDP
  • Coca-Cola’s revenue was greater than Bolivia’s GDP
  • Visa made more than Bosnia’s GDP
  • Walt Disney’s takings exceeded Bulgaria’s GDP
  • Microsoft’s revenue surpassed Slovakia’s GDP

And so it goes. Even corporations like Netflix, Spotify, and Tesla make the bigger-than-countries list. That’s good for capitalism and capitalists, but it challenges the historical ideal that nation states ought to be in charge of running the world.

More next time.

Economic Storytelling [2]: Hail the Conquering Capitalist Comes

handel    hail the conquering

Handel wrote “See, the Conquering Hero Comes!” for his oratorio Judas Maccabaeus, created to commemorate the Duke of Cumberland’s stomping out of the Jacobite rebellion at the Battle of Culloden in 1746.

Two hundred years later, hay fever stricken non-hero Woodrow Lafayette Pershing Truesmith rode a myth of his own heroism, fabricated by well-intentioned friends, to a public moment of truth in the 1944 film Hail the Conquering Hero. But that was Hollywood, and everybody was happy in the end as Woodrow lived out the popular “redemption” narrative that Silicon Valley loves, as we’ve seen previously. As for the Jacobites, their story became a cautionary tale — a more sobering narrative genre.

These two conquering hero stories illustrate why non-narrative economists think we’re better off leaving stories at the water cooler:  narratives contain too much subjectivity, interpretation, cognitive bias, self-deception, and wishful thinking to be trusted, and therefore add nothing to economic policy-making, which is all those things already. You can talk “normative” all you like, but narrative policy will end up being a matter of power, not plot.

Plus, narratives can have unexpected outcomes. This article chronicles the pendulum swings that have characterized political/economic narratives for the past century, and warns that popular narratives of economic doom can have catastrophic consequences because they’re forged in simplistic thinking to the exclusion of more complex analysis:

 “[Catastrophe narrative favor] the politics of the strong man glaring down the nation-doubters… It’s globalism or ‘nation first’, jobs or climate, friend or foe.

“The alternative is not to be wistful about flat-world narratives that find solace in technical panaceas and market fundamentalisms; the last thing we need is a return to the comforts of lean-in fairy tales that rely on facile responses to a complicated world.

“Nowadays, the chorus of catastrophe presents differences as intractable and incompatible, the choice between them zero-sum.

“We need to recover our command over complex storytelling, to think of tensions instead of incompatibilities, to allow choices and alternatives, mixtures and ambiguities, instability and learning, to counter the false certainties of the abyss.”

Why We Need To Be Wary Of Narratives Of Economic Catastrophe, Aeon Magazine (Jan. 22, 2019)

I.e., if we’re going to have economic narratives at all, they need to be complex, not simplistic, and take into account the full range of “positive” and “normative” ethical judgments, as well as both mathematical modeling and fundamental human behavior. Anything short of that promotes polarized thinking, which is not only the standard of the day, but might be inescapable as long as the human brain is in charge. Coach, consultant, and author Karl Albrecht wrote the following in Psychology Today iun 2010 — before discourse disappeared entirely from American public life:

“Recent research suggests that our brains may be pre-wired for dichotomized thinking. That’s a fancy name for thinking and perceiving in terms of two – and only two – opposing possibilities.

“These research findings might help explain how and why the public discourse of our culture has become so polarized and rancorous, and how we might be able to replace it with a more intelligent conversation.

“The popular vocabulary routinely signals this dichotomizing mental habit: ‘Are you with us, or against us?’ ‘If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem.’’

Albrecht goes on to say that “imagination, creativity, and innovation all thrive in the ‘twilight zone,’ not at the poles of opinion,” and offers these seven antidotes to the plague of silo-building:

  1. Have fewer opinions.
  2. Keep your opinions and conclusions on probation.
  3. Let go of the need to be certain about everything.
  4. Seek the “third hand”- and any other “hands” you can discover.
  5. Modify your language.Replace the word “but” with “and” as often as you can, even if it sounds weird at first.
  6. Remind yourself every day that your “truth” is not the same as any other person’s truth.
  7. Avoid head-butting contests with opinionated people.

Good advice no doubt, but storytelling or not, these days capitalists and capitalism are the conquering heroes making their grand entrances. In fact, they’re so powerful that they’re eclipsing the historic “nation-state” in size and influence.

We’ll look at that next time.

Economic Storytelling

story telling

Last time, we heard Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller promote the use of narratives in economic policy-making, on the theory that it would produce more humane outcomes than mathematical modeling — for example, reversing trends such as soaring economic inequality, loss of upward mobility, stagnant purchasing power,  and declining cultural wellbeing.

Narratives are up to the challenge, proponents say, because:

  1. Humans are natural storytellers.

 “Our storytelling ability, a uniquely human trait, has been with us nearly as long as we’ve been able to speak. Whether it evolved for a particular purpose or was simply an outgrowth of our explosion in cognitive development, story is an inextricable part of our DNA.”

The Power Of Story, Aeon Magazine (Jan. 12, 2015)

  1. There’s nothing like a good story to make you rethink your life.

“The careers of many great novelists and filmmakers are built on the assumption, conscious or not, that stories can motivate us to re-evaluate the world and our place in it.

 “New research is lending texture and credence to what generations of storytellers have known in their bones – that books, poems, movies, and real-life stories can affect the way we think and even, by extension, the way we act.

“Across time and across cultures, stories have proved their worth not just as works of art or entertaining asides, but as agents of personal transformation.”

The Power Of Story

  1. Narratives supply a welcome sense of meaning:

“Each of us has a story we tell about our own life, a way of structuring the past and fitting events into a coherent narrative. Real life is chaotic; life narratives give it meaning and structure.”

Silicon Phoenix:  A Gifted Child, An Adventure, A Dark Time, And Then … A Pivot? How Silicon Valley Rewrote America’s Redemption Narrative, Aeon Magazine (May 2, 2016)

  1. Stories are catchy: brain scans show that listeners’ and readers’ brains mirror the storyteller’s — another reason why they make good change agents.

“fMRI data [shows] that emotion-driven responses to stories… [starts] in the brain stem, which governs basic physical functions, such as digestion and heartbeat. So when we read about a character facing a heart-wrenching situation, it’s perfectly natural for our own hearts to pound.

“Just when the speaker’s brain lit up in the area of the insula – a region that governs empathy and moral sensibilities – the listeners’ insulae lit up, too. Listeners and speakers also showed parallel activation of the temporoparietal junction, which helps us imagine other people’s thoughts and emotions. In certain essential ways, then, stories help our brains map that of the storyteller.”

Silicon Phoenix

  1. American capitalism already has an established story genre — the “redemption narrative” — that it can rely upon to good effect.

“For Americans, the redemption narrative is one of the most common and compelling life stories. In the arc of this life story, adversity is not meaningless suffering to be avoided or endured; it is transformative, a necessary step along the road to personal growth and fulfilment.

“For the past 15 years, Daniel McAdams, professor of psychology at Northwestern University in Illinois, has explored this story and its five life stages: (1) an early life sense of being somehow different or special, along with (2) a strong feeling of moral steadfastness and determination, ultimately (3) tested by terrible ordeals that are (4) redeemed by a transformation into positive experiences and (5) zeal to improve society.

“This sequence doesn’t necessarily reflect the actual events of the storyteller’s life, of course. It’s about how people interpret what happened – their spin, what they emphasise in the telling and what they discard.”

Silicon Phoenix

  1. Redemption narratives make good citizens, and never mind if there’s some ego involved:

“In his most recent study, the outcome of years of intensive interviews with 157 adults, McAdams has found that those who adopt [redemption narratives] tend to be generative – that is, to be a certain kind of big-hearted, responsible, constructive adult.

“Generative people are deeply concerned about the future; they’re serious mentors, teachers and parents; they might be involved in public service. They think about their legacy, and want to fix the world’s problems.

“But generative people aren’t necessarily mild-mannered do-gooders. Believing that you have a mandate to fix social problems – and that you have the moral authority and the ability to do so – also requires a sense of self-importance, even a touch of arrogance.”

Silicon Phoenix

  1. Stories are good for the American capitalist ideal.

“From a more sociological perspective, the American self-creation myth is, inherently, a capitalist one…. The sociologist Paul du Gay [believed that most people] craft outward-looking ‘enterprising selves’ by which they set out to acquire cultural capital in order to move upwards in the world, gain access to certain social circles, certain jobs, and so on. We decorate ourselves and cultivate interests that reflect our social aspirations. In this way, the self becomes the ultimate capitalist machine.”

Silicon Phoenix:

But of course, not everyone shares these rosy opinions of narrative economics, or of the current practice of American capitalism. We’ll hear from the naysayers next time.

The End is at Hand

the end is at hand

… but you still might want to check out the bus schedule for your ride home.

I’ve been studying jobs and the new economy for nearly three years, and blogging about them for two. For reasons I’ll talk about later, I’ll be drawing this blog series to a close at the end of September. In the meantime, I thought this might be a good time to invite you to check out my other blog — here’s a link to its About page.

I say that because I just started a new “consciousness and the self” series there, and today I’m drafting an installment that borrows from an earlier post here, on the topic of “finding your true calling” in your vocation.

The other blog has a different focus than this one, but there’s some overlap in content, and I write it in the same style, with a commitment to research and letting the pros offer their opinions. If you like that approach, you might like what you find over there.

That’s all. Just wanted to give you a heads up. See you on Thursday with the next installment of “homo economicus.”

Homo Economicus [5]: Ethics and Economics

homo economicus

This Harvard Crimson op-ed argues that that economic policy-making doesn’t embrace the full human story because what’s missing in free market self-interested capitalism is due regard for “normative ethics” :

“Economists distinguish between ‘positive’ and ‘normative’ judgments. Positive judgments are testable and predicated on objective facts. Normative judgments weigh those facts according to subjective personal values.

“Although Enlightenment-era economics was normative and philosophical, contemporary economics is a precise and quantitative science that seeks to determine what happens in the world under a particular set of assumptions. Policymakers, political philosophers, and ordinary citizens can then evaluate those occurrences according to their own normative judgments and determine whether they find them desirable.

“Responsible economic scholarship requires assigning positive and normative judgments separate roles in the policymaking process. They do not simply trade off; they have entirely different jobs.”

 “[Economists] are often characterized as robots completely devoid of ethics, chasing professional ambitions that are as sterile and soulless as they are. Authors, including in these pages, have written that human ethics are incompatible with good economic policy. This line of argument claims that our economic logic should be free from our personal values, and we must prevent our moral judgments from “getting in the way” of objective decisions…  this logic is flawed… It is not the strength of one’s feelings that matters, but rather that they fulfill their proper role in the decision making process.”

The article urges policy-makers to give equal time to both positive and normative judgments. This commentator agrees, but admits that normative  concerns — the province of behavioral economics — can be messy:

“[In economics], the beauty of a mathematical model may have little to do with the complexity of local institutions and other bottlenecks to getting prices to work or markets to clear without externalities.  Behavioral economics is far messier than standard models of rationality.”

Yale economics professor and Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller advocates for “narrative economics” — a practice driven by the human love of storytelling  — to bring a human touch to the profession. “Not everyone is equally proficient at understanding narratives,” he says, “and economists are among the worst at appreciating them.” He thinks economists need to fix that.

“Twenty-five years ago, Chicago Booth’s Dick Thaler and I set up a series of workshops at the National Bureau of Economic Research on what we called “behavioral economics.” Behavioral economics was economics with an input from the psychology department. Every department has its own tool kit for approaching research; we were very much influenced by psychology. Maybe a little sociology, maybe a little anthropology, but nevertheless all social-science fields. I’m starting now, with my more recent work, to think that we have to look at the humanities as well.

“There is something difficult to formalize about human beings, but something that we nonetheless have to understand, and I think one way to do that is with an approach that I’m calling “narrative economics”: taking economics and adding the study of the narratives that people transmit.

“The human brain is built around narratives. We call ourselves Homo sapiens, but that may be something of a misnomer…. The evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould said we should be called Homo narrator. Your mind is really built for narratives.”

Economics And The Human Instinct For Storytelling, Robert Shiller, Chicage Booth Review (May 8, 2017)

As usual, Silicon Valley is ahead of the game, having already embraced the power of story as its own cultural norm:

“In Silicon Valley these days, you haven’t really succeeded until you’ve failed, or at least come very close. Failing – or nearly failing – has become a badge of pride. It’s also a story to be told, a yarn to be unspooled.

“The stories tend to unfold the same way, with the same turning points and the same language: first, a brilliant idea and a plan to conquer the world. Next, hardships that test the mettle of the entrepreneur. Finally, the downfall – usually, because the money runs out. But following that is a coda or epilogue that restores optimism. In this denouement, the founder says that great things have or will come of the tribulations: deeper understanding, new resolve, a better grip on what matters.

“Unconsciously, entrepreneurs have adopted one of the most powerful stories in our culture: the life narrative of adversity and redemption.”

Silicon Phoenix:  A Gifted Child, An Adventure, A Dark Time, And Then … A Pivot? How Silicon Valley Rewrote America’s Redemption Narrative, Aeon Magazine (May 2, 2016)

More on economic narratives coming up.

For more on ethics and economics, see Ethics and Economics (The Library of Economics and Liberty), The Economics of Ethics and the Ethics of Economics:  Values, Markets and the State (2010), and Ethics in Economics: An Introduction to Moral Frameworks (2015).