The Fame Monster: Rockstars And Rockstar Entrepreneurs

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Fame is an effective promotional strategy. It might even make life better. But handle it with care. 

Maybe you want to be the next startup superstar, Or a world class athlete. Or that freelancer — so in demand you have to turn away work. Or a coach, consultant, author, speaker, singer, actor, doctor, lawyer, microbrewer, yoga teacher, butcher, baker, candlestick maker….

Great! Here’s step one: get famous. Build a platform of loyal followers to pack your virtual cheering section with likes, follows, shares, and five star reviews. Then, if N people think you’re famous, and each year P percent of them spend $ with you, your revenues will be NP$.

Simple.

But that’s not what most people think about when they think about being famous. Most of the time, fame means being known, big time — big enough that it makes our companies profitable and ourselves rich.

But why stop at being famous? Why not …

Be a Rock Star!

Why do we want that?

For more, including my personal run-in with the allure of the Fame Monster, click here for my latest LinkedIn Pulse article.

Lessons From This Year’s Tour de France

I thought you might enjoy my latest LinkedIn Pulse post:

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Feeding the Beast (But isn’t that a bad thing?) Lessons from this year’s Tour de France on professionalism, managing creativity, exercise addiction, and the law of sport

Romain Bardet had it going for awhile in Stage 17, but his legs failed him in the stretch, turning his outing into «une journée terrible» (“a terrible day”).   Read more….

 

Travel-Inside and Out

In my last post to this blog a few months ago, I said I’d be traveling. We have been, and how times flies!  We’re already halfway through our stay in Seoul — about seven weeks.  My wife Janet and I have been posting about our experiences and observations on Medium, in a blog we call Travel, Inside and Out. I invite you to join and follow our adventures there!

 

View collection at Medium.com

Professional Paradigms New and Old (4): Failure As A Virtue

As we saw last week, one way to engage with a paradigm shift is to “walk in stupid every day.” That won’t be easy for professionals,:  our job is to be smart; our brains are culturally wired with that expectation. Being “stupid” turns that cultural expectation on its ear, makes our brain circuits fritz.

So does another powerful paradigm-busting tool:  learning to embrace failure. Professional cultural paradigms include conventional wisdom about how to succeed; flying in the face of them is a set up for failure.

In their book Wired to Create (which we looked at last time), Scott Barry Kaufman and Carolyn Gregoire cite the work of psychologist Robert J. Sternberg, who identified several key attributes of people who are “willing to generate and promote ideas that are novel and even strange and out of fashion” — i.e., who would embrace a paradigm shift. According to Dr. Sternberg, that kind of person:

  • Tries to do what others think is impossible;
  • Is a noncomformist;
  • Is unorthodox;
  • Questions societal norms, truisms, and assumptions.

Life is risky for nonconformists. According to Kaufman and Gregoire:

“Sternberg found that artists [who participated in his study] said that a creative person is one who takes risks and is willing to follow through on the consequences of those risks. Businesspeople, meanwhile, responded that a creative person in the business world is one who steers clear of the pitfalls of conventional ways of thinking.”

The inherent risks of unconventional thinking require a willingness to fail — so says organizational psychologist Adam Grant in his TED talk on “The Surprising Habits of Original Thinkers”:

“The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most,
because they’re the ones who try the most.
You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get a few good ones.”

No wonder W+K — the uber-creative ad agency we looked at last time — has a Fail Harder Wall.

Then what about our professional obligation to be smart, and steer clear of risk and failure? David P Barash, evolutionary biologist and professor of psychology and biology at the University of Washington, tackles that conundrum in an article entitled Paradigms Lost, that begins this way:

“Science is not a ‘body of knowledge’ – it’s a dynamic, ongoing reconfiguration of knowledge and must be free to change.

“The capacity for self-correction is the source of science’s immense strength, but the public is unnerved by the fact that scientific wisdom isn’t immutable. Scientific knowledge changes with great speed and frequency – as it should – yet public opinion drags with reluctance to be modified once established. And the rapid ebb and flow of scientific ‘wisdom’ has left many people feeling jerked around, confused, and increasingly resistant to science itself.”

Unlike science, the law profession’s conventional cultural paradigm does not embrace change “with great speed and frequency.” On the other hand, the new paradigm/technology-driven legal practice developments do precisely that — which, according to the existing paradigm, makes them a high risk, fast road to failure.

Those who choose to innovate in the face of this risk need creativity and courage. Once again, this is from Wired to Create:

“The history of creative thought and social progress is littered with similar stories of banned books, culture wars, persecuted artist, and paradigm-shifting innovations that change the way we look at the world.

“In choosing to do things differently, [creative people] accept the possibility of failure — but it is precisely this risk that opens up the possibility of true innovation.”

But can a professional paradigm truly embrace failure? More next time.

The Legal Times They Are A Changin 4  33%

 

Check out this collection of last year’s Future of Law blog posts. It’s a FREE download. Also included is the Culture of Law series from the second half of 2015. Click this link or the cover for downloading details.

The Legal Times They Are A-Changin’ (Part Two)

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(The following is taken from the Preface to a just-published collection of my blog posts from the past year. This is the second of a two-part miniseries.)

The Culture of Law

Having followed new practice models and technologies all the way to a new role for the law in human culture, I stumbled across one more stunning realization:  In order for the legal entrepreneurial practice models and technologies to sustain themselves within a context still recognizable as what we consider to be the legal profession today, a new law culture would need to arise with them. Without a new law culture, the new law would be patched onto the old version of the legal profession and the garment would tear, leaving what was left of the profession to degenerate into non-visionary squabbling over issues like non-lawyer ownership of legal services and multi-jurisdictional legal entities. The big picture would be lost in a myopic preoccupation with making new developments fit existing paradigms. Meanwhile the larger legal paradigm would keep shifting, resulting in a haphazard and messy arrival.

That realization led to a follow up series on The Culture of Law, which occupied the second half of 2015. Following Prof. Austin’s lead and my personal interest in neuroscience, I examined how culture is formed from the inside out — beginning literally with how lawyers’ brains are re-wired in law school and entry into legal practice. Among other things, I learned that culture is formed and changed in individual brains, and is transmitted from one brain to another until the Tipping Point is reached and the collective brains of the culture find themselves wondering how it is that the old culture seems so entirely gone and the new one so entirely present. When that day comes, the New Normal will be the only normal some people in the law culture have ever known. Pause for a moment and try to get your head around what that would be like, if that were true of you.

Why this collection?

Dylan album for book coverYou noticed, of course, that its cover and title mimic Bob Dylan’s seminal 60’s album and its anthem “The Times They Are A-Changin’.” Referencing Dylan and the 60’s is not a me-too grab for social revolutionary status, it’s a recognition of the social revolution that is already upon us. Something much, much bigger than new practice technologies and non-lawyer ownership of legal service providers is shaking underfoot. The practice models and cultural dynamics that make up the legal profession’s status quo today simply will not be with us in 50 years. Some won’t be here in 20, maybe not in 5 or 10. Some are gone already. As they disappear — one by one, and in batches — a new world of law will emerge to replace them. And when it does, the law’s role in human society — and thus human society itself — will have changed with it. All of that will happen though a process that is evolutionary, inevitable, and already well underway — begun, literally, in the re-wiring of law student and lawyer brains.

And yet…

In the midst of all of this seismic change, there is yet one essential element waiting to fully play its hand:  us — that is, those of us who inhabit the legal profession, who consider it an essential milieu of our work and our lives, and who care enough to lend a hand in creating its new future and culture, which wait for our participation to bring them fully into existence. The question is not whether the new future and culture of law will arrive, it is whether we’ll lend a hand in bringing it about.

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.”

Suddenly Dylan’s lyric has new relevance:

“Your old road is rapidly fading/
Please get out of the new one if you can’t lend your hand.”

The lyric is both a challenge and an invitation, which brings us back to that question about the legal profession’s curious indifference to its own welfare. As it turns out, our neurological wiring has such an innate allegiance to status quo — even to our own detriment — that most of us simply won’t get the invitation, or won’t open it if we do. But for those who do, and who choose to engage with the massive professional and societal developments already underway, change will become not merely evolutionary, but revolutionary. For them, the times will become a once-in-forever passion and opportunity.

Revolutions spawned in changing times require extraordinary visionary courage, expressed ultimately not merely in ideas but in action. Which is why both the Future of Law and Culture of Law blog series ended the same way, with the same insight:  “The best way to predict the future is to create it.” And why both offer us the same choice:

Will we rise to the challenge and create the future of law
and a new culture of law to support it?

Or will we simply hunker down and go along for the ride,
letting the unpredictable forces of cultural evolution handle it for us,
at the risk of ending up somewhere we never intended to go?

I would be delighted if this collection helps us to frame our response.

(The quote “The best way to predict the future is to create it” has been ascribed to a lot of different people, including Peter Drucker and Alan Kay. But according to the Quote Investigator, it appeared first in 1963 in the book Inventing the Future by Dennis Gabor, who was later awarded a Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in holography.)

The Legal Times They Are A Changin 4 33%The Legal Times They Are A-Changin’ is the second collection of Kevin’s blog posts focuses on the future and culture of law, including insights on technology, innovation, neuro-culture, and entrepreneurship. Extensively researched, visionary, and written in a crisp, conversational style by a man on a mission to bring wellbeing to the people who learn, teach, and practice the law.

The Legal Times They Are A-Changin’ (Part One)

Legal Times banner (2)

The following is taken from the Preface to a just-published collection of my blog posts from the past year.

Killing Them Softly 

Law enlightenment 2nd edition 33%My book Law, Enlightenment, and Other States of Mind (now available in a revised second edition) collected several years of my blog posts for the Legal Connection. It ended with a series called Killing Them Softly, featuring the work of University of Denver Law professor Debra S. Austin. (See Killing Them Softly: Neuroscience Reveals How Brain Cells Die From Law School Stress And How Neural Self-Hacking Can Optimize Cognitive Performance. See also her article Drink Like a Lawyer.)

Research studies and media stories about lawyer depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and suicide are legion, but Prof. Austin’s Killing Them Softly sounded a new kind of alarm through its application of neuroscience to the chronic stresses of law school and legal practice and its depiction of how law students and lawyers suffer cognitive brain damage that impairs them from doing precisely what their studies and practices require.

How’s that working for you, if you’re a client? Or an educator? Or a spouse? Or any number of other people with vested interests in law student and lawyer health and performance?

The more I blogged about Killing Them Softly, the more I wondered:

If we know we’re hurting ourselves, then why don’t we stop it?

We Are The Borg

Resistance-is-futile-Picard-BorgI’d blogged before about the legal world’s confounding indifference to its own welfare. This time, I broached the topic in a short series called Saving Ourselves From Ourselves, using Star Trek’s bad guys The Borg to lighten the inquiry. I mean, it was the end of the year (2014) and holiday time, after all. My attempt at levity didn’t help. Not really. The topic was too disturbing and the Borg “you will be assimilated” metaphor too appropriate. The law profession’s entrenched willingness to tolerate and continue unhealthy and performance-impairing practices wasn’t going away that easily.

Meanwhile, I’d noticed that an emerging subset of the legal profession seemed to be having a more upbeat experience. These were the new legal entrepreneurs, who seemed to have cornered the market on inspired action and were busy creating a bold new future for law practice. And yet, from what I could tell, the mainstream of lawyers remained unaware of the seismic shift in the legal profession happening right under their feet. They simply didn’t have ears to hear or eyes to see; they didn’t and apparently couldn’t feel the tremors. Once again I wondered:  Why not?

The Future of Law

I had written about trends in law practice before as well, but armed with new research, I launched a new series at the start of the new year (2015) on The Future of Law. And then, for some reason I couldn’t articulate then and still can’t, I decided to play like a futurist and predict where the future of law was going. The predictions flowed easily once I focused on the larger trends driving the entrepreneurial initiatives, such as globalization, commoditization, democratization, and big data. Those trends were mostly finding expression in new legal practice models and technologies, and in hindsight my predictions in that arena frankly weren’t all that remarkable, although they certainly seemed so to me when I wrote them.

No surprise, then, that one week I would predict something, only to discover within short order an example of it. No, I hadn’t developed a new gift of clairvoyance, I was only tapping into what was already happening. In fact, I was fast being left behind:  not only were the legal entrepreneurs busy creating a new future for law practice, but both legal and popular media were equally busy covering it. I had just come late to the party.

I helped myself liberally to the news as I wrote my blog, but then a more stunning realization about the future of law began to dawn in my awareness. This realization came to me in a series of waves, each amplifying the others:

  • The new practice models and technologies wouldn’t only change how law is practiced, they would invariably re-create lawyers themselves — who they are, and what they do.
  • As a result, a new kind of lawyer would engage in a new kind of law practice, alongside a new kind of legal expert who wouldn’t even qualify to be called a lawyer in today’s regulatory environment.
  • Alongside both of them, consumers (no longer “clients”) would themselves also practice law in a wave of legal DIY aided by artificial intelligence algorithms engineered by cyber geeks and served up online.
  • The combined impetus of all these developments would create a new kind of law— new in both substantive content and in how it is created, shaped, communicated, and applied.
  • In particular, this new kind of law would be created and disseminated, and would grow and change, by processes other than the historical reliance on legislation and appellate precedent and lawyer-to-client communication.
  • Finally, the advent of a new kind of law would transform the law’s role as a foundational institution in the larger cultural context in which it lives and moves and has its being.

Seismic change, indeed.

Continued next time.

The Legal Times They Are A Changin 4 33%The Legal Times They Are A-Changin’ is the second collection of Kevin’s blog posts focuses on the future and culture of law, including insights on technology, innovation, neuro-culture, and entrepreneurship. Extensively researched, visionary, and written in a crisp, conversational style by a man on a mission to bring wellbeing to the people who learn, teach, and practice the law.

 

What’s Up For the New Year

New year party hatThe past couple years, this blog has been mostly about profession-wide trends. When it began a few years ago, it focused on personal development. This year, we’re going back to that beginning, within some blurry lines.

Researching law practice trends in the past year, I’ve discovered great sources such as Above the Law, The Lawyerist, and The Likeable Lawyer. There’s also mindfulness evangelist Jeena Cho, and law futurist par excellence, Richard Susskind. And right in my own backyard there’s the IAALS (The Institute For the Advancement of the American Legal System). There are plenty more where those came from.

Knowing that all those sources are out there, doing such a great job at what they do, I’ve grown reluctant to use this blog to simply recycle their material. I recommend them to you if you want to beef up your list of sources with a finger on the pulse of the paradigm shift that’s happening in the legal world these days.

Beyond those law-specific sources, I read and research a lot about creativity and innovation, health and wellbeing, consciousness and personal growth. I’ve noticed that, in the realm of personal development, the genre lines have gotten blurry. Entrepreneurs talk about mindfulness, humanities profs cite quantum physics, and everybody talks about neuroscience, so that now we have all these hyphenated new disciplines:  neuro-culture, neuro-anthropology, neuro-biology…. I haven’t seen nuero-legal yet, but I’ll bet it’s coming.

The Information Age is serving up a rich cross-fertilization of multi-disciplinary ideas. Entrepreneurial innovation takes cues from artistic creation, business builds itself around social causes, and leadership thought leaders borrow the language of the archetypal inner hero’s journey.

While some groups around the world are darkening into fundamentalist rage, there’s a counter movement that’s waking up moment-by-moment into a bigger, bolder, brighter future that — guess what? — even has lawyers in it.

Imagine that.

No, I mean really. Use your imagination to get your heart and soul around a bigger, bolder, brighter future for lawyers and the law.

Feels pretty good.

That’s where we’re going this year — into that cross-disciplinary brightness. And along the way, because everybody likes a good story, I plan to tell more of them. Many will be my own, and why not? Classic literature has known forever that where we’re most personal we’re also most universal, and I’ve learned to trust that my stories have the same effect. I’ll be honest, I’ve been a reluctant learner on this point, but I think I’m getting it. So we’re going there, too.

That’s what’s up for the new year. But before we go entirely there, I’m going to take the next two weeks to put one final exclamation point on last year’s Future of Law and Culture of Law series, and invite your participation in The Moral of the Story one last time. That’s not entirely a digression, though, because if you accept that invitation, it will become the wildest ride of personal development you could (not) ever imagine.

‘Til then, thanks for reading, and see you next time.

Kevin Rhodes has been a lawyer for over 30 years. Drawing on insights gathered from science, technology, disruptive innovation, entrepreneurship, neuroscience, and psychology, and also from his personal experiences as a practicing lawyer and a “life athlete,” he’s on a mission to bring wellbeing to the people who learn, teach, and practice the law.